affirmative action essay harvard university

of the many differences within Asian-American communities and of the ways in which those differences may enrich the. For Asian-American students, the imperative to show originality will continue. Just last year, the Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the University of Texas at Austins affirmative-action program, which, like Harvards, aims to build a diverse class along multiple dimensions and considers race as one factor in a holistic review of each applicant. Part of the Harvard brief suggest a focus on public opinion and not just legal opinion. Continued use of affirmative action of the kind upheld by the Supreme Court is perfectly compatible with tackling the discrimination at issue. New briefs from university provide an inside look at terms like "standard strong" and examples of Asian applicants whose ethnicity was viewed favorably and dispute statistical analysis provided by those claiming anti-Asian bias. At selective colleges, Asians are demographically overrepresented minorities, but they are underrepresented relative to the applicant pool. Should colleges pursue their interest in a diverse class by limiting admissions of a minority group whose numbers may otherwise overwhelm the class? Harvard said that the review was discounted because it was preliminary and incomplete. The New Jews of Harvard Admissions." A column in, uSA Today featured the headline asians Get the Ivy League's Jewish Treatment.". The plaintiffs have repeatedly cited Harvard's past discrimination (a century ago) against Jewish applicants as an example of what the university would do to maintain a student body with characteristics it seeks.

affirmative action essay harvard university

And the Harvard brief stressed repeatedly that the documents the university released to the plaintiffs, and in turn used in the plaintiffs' briefs, do not contain negative comments about Asian applicants or ever refer to a" system or a desire to keep Asian enrollments. Affirmative action has consistently been a wedge issue, and groups such as Asian Americans Advancing Justice have opposed attempts to use Asian students as the wedge in conservative attacks on affirmative action that may harm black and Latino students. States that have banned affirmative action can show us that. When I won a scholarship that paid for part of my education, a selection panelist told me that I got it because I had moving qualities of heart and originality that Asian applicants generally lacked.

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Another argument made by Students for Fair Admissions is that Harvard admissions officers routinely cite the potential ways that non-Asian minority applicants might add to the diversity on campus, but don't make such comments about Asian applicants. The truth is that, in addition to a holistic review of each applicant that considers race as one factor, colleges undertake some amount of balancing so that they do not end up with a class that is swamped by members of any particular raceor with. I would not relish seeing the nations most élite colleges become majority Asian, which is what has resulted at selective high schools, such as Stuyvesant, that do not consider race in admissions at all. At the end of the admissions process, the class of applicants is fine-tuned through a so-called lop list, which includes race. Colleges have fully taken on this justification to the point that, today, they rarely mention the issue of inequality, or even of a diverse leadership, perhaps because theyre worried about getting sued. On this issue, Harvard responds by"ng comments written by admissions counselors on applicants' portfolios that suggest Asian background is in fact cited in some cases as a "positive factor.". The court complaint"s a college counsellor at the highly selective Hunter College High School (which I happened to attend who was reporting a Harvard admissions officers feedback to the school: certain of its Asian students werent admitted, the officer said, because so many. Is an admissions process that disadvantages a minority group benign, or even desirable, if that minority group is demographically overrepresented in higher education? It is also time to look seriously at the impact on Asians (many of them immigrants or the children of immigrants) of the advantage enjoyed by legacy admissions and wealthy families who are likely to give significant donations.